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hostess our father in law the angelica van buren is white house hostess for her father in law. law school ork review and the new york law school racial justice private hosted a series of panel discussions on civil society and the writings of dr. seuss. the popular children's book author. topics included shared interests in society. this is an hour and 25 minutes. >> good morning. >> good morning. my job here is to introduce the first panel. i would like to also welcome you all. anm delighted to be part of event that looks at the relationship between law the popular culture. there is a deep and abiding connection. we gain insights, as we will see today will move back and forth. i will introduce the members of the first panel. starting with anne mcgillivray view is a professor of law at the university of manitoba. come on up. courses include crime, law, and society. she has written a book called "black eyes all the time." she has also written "he would have made a wonderful solicitor in dracula." naomi mezey is a professor of law at georgetown university law center. she is an award winning
. schoolnew york law repute and racial justice project recently hosted panel discussions on civil society and the writings of dr. seuss. topics included shared interest in society. this is one hour and 25 minutes. >> good morning. introduce the to first panel. i would like to also welcome you all. i am delighted to be part of an event that looks at the relationship between law the popular culture. there is a deep and abiding connection. wii gain insights, as we will see today will move back and forth. i will introduce the members of the first panel. mcgillivrayh anne view is a professor of law at the university of manitoba. come on up. courses include crime, law, and society. is written a book called "black ."es all the time is also written "he would have ine a wonderful solicitor dracula." omi mezey is a professor of university lawwn center. she is an award winning feature. she is known for her interdisciplinary works on law and culture, particularly popular culture. jorge contreras is an associate professor of law at the washington college of law. he comes from a science background. he
and congress back in 1968 actually made them the law of the land, but they don't apply to 40% of the gun sales today. something like 58,000 gun dealers across this country, three times the number of mcdonald's stores, as a matter of fact, there are gun stores every place in this country, and those gun sellers -- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one t
to open my stand. will the police bust me? >> there are so many laws, everybody could be caught up in it. >> the avalanche of new laws, it makes criminals just about all of us. >> every citizen arguably could be shown to have violated some regulation in these stacks, that is the danger. >> police never told knees girls why they were shut down. >> we tried to find out but the city official, they said really they shut down our lemonade stand. >> we're not aware of who made the lemonade or what the lemonade with. you are still breaking the law and we can't let you dot. >> appleton, wisconsin shut down this stand and these kids were shut down, too. >> they said you need a permit. >> and hazelwood, illinois they settled on girl scout cookies from the front yard but the city said to stop. >> i said, what? cookies, come on. >> all has to people ran afoul of laws they didn't know existed and still don't understand. >> they are ununderstandable, not only to you but people lik me, i am a lawyer and they are incomprehenble to me. >> even the police don't understand. she says the kids' lemonade stan
at dearborn law-enforcement association. thank you for inviting me to speak to you about the use of unmanned aircraft a small colorado community where he lives. the mesa county sheriff's office is a middle sized of a 200 people at the patrol chamber 65 deputies. this are approximately 175,000 citizens to the infiniti 3300 square-mile county. we see a wide range for petty offenses to major crime including drug trafficking and homicide. in four years with lumbar operational hours than anyone else in the country with 185 and over 40 missions. the two small battery operated aircraft systems that's a lot considering this one on the table here is a backpack size helicopter that can fly for 15 minutes and weighs two pounds. our smaller plane can fly for an hour and weighs just about eight pounds. both systems are used to carry canvas which are commercially available. in fact coming committee same camera at wal-mart. have a tissue at the brief examples of how we use this equipment. my first example occurred last may when an historic church cup higher. recruited from a camel which allowed us to show
into law. we will be taking that up with the "a-team." angela mcglowan, james toronto and doug schoen. our first guest is here to evaluate obama's middle east tour. today's focus on the enormous price on jordan as a result of the syrian civil war. joining me now is judith miller and quivered clifford may. it is a very big positive impression with this to her, if not a concrete result. >> it was an extraordinary tour. the israelis called it a thermo nuclear charm offensive. talk about a restart in a relationship that was crying out. basically the president figured out do you attract more bees with honey in a country like israel who did everything he had to do to put a relationship on course. lou: wasn't he inconsistent to be talking about peace in the middle east? at the same time that he was threatening bashar al-assad and a wrong? >> yes, but they are both provocative. they are both belligerent. they are destabilizing forces and have been for years. he understands that the israelis are reliable allies, valuable allies in many ways. they are in a difficult neighborhood. the israelis, two y
. angelica van buren is the white house hostess for her father-in- law, president martin van buren, who was a widower. we will include your comments and questions tonight live at 9 eastern on c-span and c-span3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> former defense department on ail jeh johnson targeted killings overseas. administration faces questions over that legal rationale of that operation. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. it is a pleasure to welcome you here today to new york's never ending winter. glad to see you could get up so early and break your way here. we are very excited about today's conference. first, i want to give a few banks. , directorthank susan of the center on national security here at fordham for her work in putting together this conference with me. it is god'sine work, so we have done that as well as everything else. today we are looking at 21st century warfare law, the enemy, and the battlefield. andthe work of the center fort the other national security center law school, basically this is what we have been looking at for 12 years. legale been
. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of yucca mountain which by law is designated as the site for permanent geological repository for our nation's spent nuclear fuel. last year the president's blue ribbon commission on america's nuclear future issued a report but barred from even evaluating the merits of yucca mountain, despite the fact that it has been approved in a bipartisan basis by congress and signed into law by the president -- actually reaffirmed by signing of the law in 2002, the initial law was passed in 1982, and the law was amended in 1987 which in a bipartisan manner passed thue both chambers, signed by -- through both chambers, signed by different presidents, established that yucca mountain would be the repository for our nuclear spent fuel. what the blue ribbon commission did say was any host community should expect incentives. that commitment is no different from nevada when it comes to yucca mountain, and good news. the local county is consenting and ready to negotiate with the department of energy. in advance of yucca mountain even receiving its first deliver
neil/lehrer productions >> ifill: supreme court justices weighed a challenge to an arizona law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk to marcia coyle about today's court arguments, and ask about the broader implications for other immigration laws. >> ifill: then we turn to the banking crisis in cyprus, as european union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight
with that giant gavel to pass this law she said we'd have to find the details once it was approved. three years later we found out. we're getting slammed. >> welcome everybody. i'm cavuto? how you neil because when nance sis i blowing out the candles today -- >> below wellness, prevention, no denial for preexisting conditions no lifetime limits on care. >> neil: what will be a pretty tough law. after you blow out the candles you're the one who is going to get burned, especially when you go into the not so pretty little surprises emerging. she has had this from the very beginning. the only person in the country who has read and it understands it. >> i read so it you don't have to neil. >> actually i did read it, but you actually understood it. but here's what you were telling me then and what we were fearing there the goodies were loaded up front. coverage for preexisting conditions, getting your kids on the policy longer, free. >> noaa. >> neil: and the glad stuff -- >> after the 2012 election. now the president said if you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor. you won't be able to find y
pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
have no budget from the president, in violation of the law. he gets his ncaa bracket in on time but still no budget. this is the fourth time in five years. he set a new record this year, two months with no plan, while we had trillion-dollar deficits and a debt crisis on the horizon. his party leaders, unfortunately, failing offering a serious account of our challenge. no serious plan to grow our economy or create jobs. no plan to ever balance the budget. take more. trillions of dollars more to spend more in washington. that's what got us in this mess in the first place. so what can be done? the good news is that we now have a vehicle for regular order. the democrats derailed the budget process each of the last few years and stopped governing when they stopped budgeting. at least we now have a budget process that's moving. we brought them back in the game this spring. that's a good thing. so what's going to happen in the weeks ahead? well, we will make the case for our priorities. whether the gentleman from maryland wants to acknowledge it or not, we have divided government. the
it personally, and as a matter of policy and law. embedded in a broader effort to advance equality and opportunity for lgbt americans and all americans. to deny the opportunity to any of our daughters and sons, solely on the basis of who they are, and who they love is to deny them the chance to live up to their own god-given potential. >> one of the things that she said in this video that gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights, which is an echo of her famous declaration at the international women's conference in beijing back in '95. where she really stirred the fires in international diplomacy as first lady by declaring women's rights human rights. >> and that was controversial back then. that was seen as a sort of revolutionary statement, the state department was nervous that she said that. they didn't really want that to happen. i think we will be looking back ten, 20 years on the notion that gay rights are human rights and think, well, duh, the same way we think about women's rights now. >> a real generational change certainly in the republican party as we w
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
. >> this is highly political. lex i am not disagreeing. neither of these have a chance of becoming law. at are you a your colleagues not more time finding a middle ground instead of going through show but? -- showboat's? >> they want to get paid. that is number one. where finally a budget you can offer amendments and highlight things that need to be changed in the federal government is an important exercise. , 76example, last night senators voted to eliminate the medical device tax. if you put that in the budget, if it is allowed to come up, it will go through the senate and through the house. ands counterproductive counter prudence in terms of supplying equipment to people whether it be a diabetic or a heart patient. reason why other it's good. i do not doubt that we should spend time -- there are a lot of talks that are being discussed about reaching -- reaching a grand bargaining. you've reached the president with his sleeves rolled up, working with senators of the other party and representatives and they will come to the consensus. wea note for our viewers, were talking about this on friday as
television. nbc's kristin welker has more on that from the white house. >> reporter: with stiffer gun laws facing an uncertain future in congress, new york mayor michael bloomberg squared off against national rifle association's ceo wayne la pierre on "meet the press" today. >> i think i've spent $12 million on running ads. >> he can't buy america. >> tell didn't don't protect criminals. >> reporter: bloomberg announced a $12 million campaign aimed at convincing swing senators to support universal background checks. >> i've owned a gun all my life and i'll fight for my right to keep it. background checks have nothing to do with taking guns away from anyone. >> reporter: bloomberg's strategy -- create a counterweight to the nra, harnessing the groundswell of support for tougher laws in the wake of the newtown tragedy. >> 90% of the public wants something and their representatives vote against that. common sense says they are going to have a price to pay for that. >> he he's going to find out this is a country of the people, by the people and for the people and he can't spend enough of his $
of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forw
requiring all voters to show photo i.d. in order to vote. a measure that opponents of that law say would suppress the vote, particularly among minority, elderly and young voters. joining me now, msnbc's joy reid. joy, michael steele said, look, you can't say this on monday and pass these kinds of things. this is part of what's alienating those voters. >> absolutely. apparently, the governor's and legislatures out there in the world didn't get the memo from nice reince priebus. the problem with these laws, lawrence, they are far more likely to disenfranchise black and hispanic youth, something like 72% of african-americans who go to vote are asked for i.d. something like 760% of hispanics, but half of white younger people who go to vote. so you're disenfranchising people directly and black and hispanic youth are far more likely to report not voting because either they don't have the i.d. or are perceived or think they don't have the i.d. so on one hand, we're going to speak more nicely to minorities, but as a back up, we're going to make it harder for them to vote. >> and joy, there's ten
job was to the introduction changed. [laughter] i happily attended stanford law school but in the process i met my husband to be john o'connor and he was a year behind me in moscow and we decided to get married and i graduated you both like to eat that met one of us would have to work and that was me. i thought no problem there were at least 40 notices from law firms and california saying law graduates we would be happy to talk to about job opportunities. give us a call. there were 40 different messages. i would call every month not a single one would even give me an interview. why? because we don't hire women. that was the way it was. i got out about 1952 but isn't that amazing? they wouldn't even talk and i really did need to get a job. [laughter] i heard the county attorney from redwood city once had a woman lawyer on the staff and i thought that was encouraging. unaided appointment. in california they elect the county attorney. so he gave me an appointment he was very ninth set -- nice and agreeable and did say he had a woman on his staff and she did well and he wou
. in 2010, federal judge walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to take a leading role in the gay marriage debate nine years ago. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: take us back to 2004. the marriage licenses began to be issued in san francisco. you had just gotten into office. what got into you? >> i went to the state of the union. nancy pelosi made a terrible mistake by giving me her husband's ticket to watch the state of the union. i was listening to the issues of the day. abstinence and drug testing. he would fulfill his private commitments now made public to
. >> they will be mindful of the limited role as judges to interpret existing law. >> plus, legal analysis on how the issues might be viewed on the highest court in the land. stay tuned for the special coverage of gay marriage before the u.s. supreme court. captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> good evening. i'm scott shafer. welcome to this week in northern california. next tuesday, more than four years after california voters approved proposition 8, the state's ban on same-sex marriage, it gets a hearing from the u.s. supreme court. it will hear arguments for the defense of marriage act known as doma. we discuss the issues before the u.s. supreme court. it's the final stop on a long and winding legal road. let's begin with a look at how it all started. the week of valentine's day, 2004, newly elected san francisco mayor gavin newsom, boldly, some said recklessly orders to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples. >> we reignited a fundamental debate. >> scott: outside city hall, gays and lesbians lines up around the block. about 4,000 couples tied the knot. it was not to last. at the
. you will not mean to. the state has interest in defending the law. are startingts interest to the state. the concern is about how society and the institution of marriage will be damaged by this radical definition. >> you agree that moral disapproval as off the table? we are not going to criminalize a homosexual activity. we cannot do that. we disapprove of its. we are not going to allow same- sex couples to call themselves married because we disapprove. >> moral disapproval has nothing bases for these defending traditional marriage. are there some voters who may have boded because of proposition 08 because of moral disapproval? it goes both ways. of course people will have a mixed motives. think the states in the house report and on the floor are off the table? not consider them? of course a lot of this will tie into which standard of review the court and adopting. when you have plenty of statements in the congressional record discussing the importance of uniform eligibility it is weird cherry picking to say we will give decisive wait to these one or two or three statements
, and control of this new gop treasure trove of data. >> this is where the campaign laws play a very important part. an outside group like american cross roads can't coordinate with a candidate so it doesn't make sense for a data project where you can give data out. it doesn't make sense. the rnc has it right. it needs to be with the rnc. they're talking about sourcing with it other group like the guy from heritage but i think it has to be run from the party. i think that has more to do with campaign laws than maybe that person who was quoted thinks. >> one of the most interesting things i thought to come out of this report, an official endorsement of immigration reform. at least it says in part, we are not a policy committee but among the steps republicans take in the hispanic community and beyond, we must embrace and champion comprehensive immigration reform. if we do not, our party's appeal will continue to shrink to its core constituencies only. is this another one where they will be butting heads with some of their own rank and file? >> not if the rank and file read the totality of that d
-paying position and if they went to law school they go to corporate law and may be bored to tears but want to do it for five to ten years to get the money to then be able to do their passion and that is the difference. when i wrote passages in the 1970s, the most famous business book and remains today what color is your parachute and the thesis was starch out following your passion. who can afford to do that as of 25-year-old who has finished college? they have to work and get some -- takes a decade to take -- pay off those college loans unless they came from a wealthy family. the other thing that i think is a big advance is the blue regeneration which was the generation that inherited the feminist revolution was 80% white. the generation of young people today is far more diversified and there are a lot of young african-american, asian-american, indian american, hispanics who voted for obama or very much responsible for the reelection of obama and are helping to mentor younger poor women which were left out of the first feminist revolution. poor women really didn't have a lot to do for them or e
duck for two months over the summer was that under the campaign finance laws, he couldn't use money that he'd already raised until after he received the nomination for president in august. i believe that our primary process is way too long. i think our calendar needs to be looked at. i think our debate calendar needs to be shrunk. i think we had way too many debates with candidates slicing and dicing each other, and i think they had to wait too long to get to the convention. i'm calling for a convention in june or july. we're going to set up a commission that's going to make that decision. i'm going to be a part of that. i'm going to chair that commission. ut no more august conventions. scommoip we're taking republican thoughts on those changes that reince priebus was talking about. give us a call. the phone numbers, we'll put up for you. we're doing our lines regionally for republicans just in this first segment of the "washington journal" tosmede a few other stories that are out there -- obama to pick tom perez for labor. that's the headline of the politico story this morning. pre
and liberal laws to voting rights. not to mention president obama already in a constitutional challenge to his choices to sit on the national labor relations board. they're taking its fight all the way to the supreme court after a d.c. appellate court invalidated the recess appointments made when the senate wasn't in recess. the senator has vowed to block the nomination. other stories we are bringing you tonight, wall street shrugging off a botched european union bailout of banks and an unprecedented tax on the deposits in cyprus, a tiny nation of 1.1 million people that will cost investors hundreds of billions of dollars in market capitalization. the dow jones industrial average down more than 100 points earlier but rebounded losing a modest 62 points. the s&p fell nine, the nasdaq down 11 and a half. the market off of the lows of the day. officials revising the imprudent and unreasonable plan to seize money from bank depositors to pay for the eu bailout. much damage has been done and some investors are so shaken, they will take their money out of the banks at their first opportunity, which i
to him. there was no indication he was going to kill a law enforcement officer. >>> judge agreed to resign. 58-year-old judge paul seeman is accused of stealing a million and a half dollars from his neighbor. ktvu channel 2 news was the first to report this story. he has been on leave since he was arrested last june but he continued to get his salary. he is facing 32 felony charges, 12 counts of perjury, elder theft and grand theft and unauthorized disclosure of information. >>> vacant store fronts are a problem for san jose. ktvu's robert handa is in downtown where a quick fix could pave the way to a permanent solution there. robert? >> reporter: that's right. we are at a building that is usually empty but as you can see it is bustling. this activity is part of san jose's plan to get rid of the economic and image related problems that come with vacant buildings. >> reporter: the chef is whipping up dishes for a crowd of people in downtown san jose. this stretch doesn't usually see much traffic because of all the vacant buildings so today they launched start up san jose, to attra
as highly political. >> i am not disagreeing. neither has a chance of becoming law. so i wonder why you and your colleagues aren't spending more time trying to find middle ground instead of going through what are effectively show votes. >> they want to get paid. and if they don't pass the budget they won't get paid. that's number one. number two, is having finally in four years having a budget where you can actually offer amendments and highlight things that you think need to be changed in the federal government is an important exercise because for example last night 79 or 76 senators voted to eliminate the medical device tax. if you vote on that in the budget, when that amendment if it is ever allowed to come up it will go through the senate and it will go through the house and we'll actually change that because it is counter productive and counter prudent in terms of supplying equipment to people whether it be a diabetic or congestive heart patient or other patients. so that is the other reason why it is good. i don't doubt that we need to spend some time and there is a lot of talk go
's proposition eight. let's start with doma. it's the federal law that defines marriage as a union between and a man and a woman. it keeps gays from get iting th same rights. president clinton signed doma into law in 1996. he now says it should be struck down. avery freedman from cleveland, good to e see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman, good to see you as well. avery, you first on this. two cases before the supreme court. let's begin with doma. how much is at stake here? >> i think this is one of the great cases that the the supreme court will hear this term. that and prop eight. but doma which was compromised legislation and signed by bill clinton back in 1996 has always been questionable in terms of constitutionality. and two federal appeals courts have held that that law that restricts personnel rights that is by the federal government violates the constitution. it violates the equal protection law. in terms of the significance of it, it's really march madness. this is so important and so exciting because you have the solicitor general arguing against the constitutionality
. the supremes are hearing arguments on a new law that civil rights advocates. it is getting hot in the court and in the spin. it is a book that says take me with you. when did you know that grandma was the one? when her sister dumped me. grandpa was my dad a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. it's what you see is what you get food. guten tag. greetings earthlings. how you doin'? hola. sup. yello. howdy. what's crackalackin? it is great we express ourselves differently. if we were all the same, life would be boring. so get to know people who aren't like you. you'll appreciate what makes us different. the more you know. >>> the supreme court heard arguments today in a dispute over arizona's
. the president's healthcare reform law turns three tomorrow and for the first time, democrats join republicans to take a step back. tonight, chief national correspondent jim angling sets the staple for obamacare future looking at -- sets the stage for obam obamacare's futu. >> broad majority of the senate voted 79-20 last night to repeal part of obamacare. a tax on medical devices from hip replacements to mri machines. >> this is about innovation about jobs. >> other taxes are in place, including a $100 billion tax on insurance premiums. that will cause the average person $100 a year. part of the financing for what the president sees as his signature policy achievement. >> after a historic vote, healthcare reform is not an unmet promise. law of the land. >> some of those who know the business next are skeptical. >> a great misconception about the obamacare is just because you have health insurance you will get adequate healthcare. nothing could be further from the truth. >> obamacare will pay less to providers and increase number of insured by 30 million. >> patients don't get the services ren
it the affordable healthcare act or obama care turned three years old today. while some of the law has already taken effect the price tag hangs in the balance and it is huge by any measure, democrat or republican. with the stroke of a pen on march 23, 2010 after months of bitter debating in congress president obama made it the signature achievement of his first term. it faced numerous appeal attempts and seen a supreme court challenge. john boehner saying when democrats rammed obama care through congress three years ago they did so with a host of promises that are proving more empty by the day. instead of keeping the coverage they have an estimated 7 million americans are at risk of losing health insurance ." then the president marking the day by praising the law saying this in part "the affordable healthcare act will give hard working middle class families the healthcare security they deserve and protect every american from the worst insurance company abuses." all this as preparations continue for a full rollout of the law less than a year from how. molly henneberg live for us in washington. critic
it the law of the land you can't discriminate in the area of marriage. >> u.s. solicitor general will have a final 10 minutes or och sigs. he represents the president and will likely be asked about mr. obama's shift to support same-sex marriage. a key justice to watch will be justice anthony ken neddy. he has been a strong degrernd of gay rights and a champion of state ri.s he could be the swing vote. the court could dismiss the case for want of standing which would allow same-sex marriages in california. the court could rule prop 8 is unconstitutional, it could threaten similar bans in other states or could leave prop 8 in place ruling states have the right to decide for themselves. the 9th circuits decision states voters didn't have the right to take away the freedom california supreme court already granted. coming up at 6:00 state attorney general will weigh in along with one of the berkeley women who is one of the plaintiffs in this case. a quick correction. i said prop 8 vote was 2004. it was 2008. on california voters ban same-sex marriage in the state. reporting from the newsroom ab
a scandal. in the next administration, angelico van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law, martin van buren, who is a wood door. -- widower. tonight, on c-span. >> last week the senate veterans affairs committee held a hearing on veterans mental health care and the need for assuring timely access to care. the hearing heard testimony from two panels, including mental health specialists and military veterans advocates. according to the veterans affairs committee chair, veterans are committing suicide at a rate of more than 8003 year and he urged the affairs department to increase the hiring rate for mental health clinicians. [gavel] of thethis hearing saturn -- senate veterans' affairs committee is beginning. i want to start by thanking our wonderful panelists for their years of experience in the important areas they are discussing with us today. i want to thank the va for being here as well. know, it isk we all 10 years with the united states went to war in iraq, went to war in afghanistan before that. what we have learned in a variety of ways is that the cost of those wars has been ve
? if you guys get over the racism, it is the law. get over it. the people who killed the people interact, it is the law. -- in iraq. host: what is the affordable care act have to do with racism ? caller: it has a lot to do with racism, taking her -- taking care of people -- we should cut the healthcare for the congress. see how they like it. we will move onto clay in biloxi, mississippi. caller: good morning. disabilityd and on after working 14 years, the five years of court reporting. we had a bombardment of advertisements for simple move -- healthcare for medicare. we find it replaces the medicare policy we currently have. after the deadline passed for the supplements, humana stopped advertising in mississippi. you can't get in touch with humana. the bureaucracy is just going to increase and as leaving the poor tople at a disadvantage correct and try to make reasonable choices for their healthcare. thank you for taking my call. host: a statement put out yesterday by the office of house democratic -- released following the statement today in recognition of the third anniversary of the a
, and the ability to get a job. not just because they are present in violation of the law but because they have a criminal record. this is a recipe for disaster that is irresponsible and unjustified. to make matters worse, many of these individuals lack the money, family, support and the ability to get a job, not just because they are present in violation of the law, but because they have a right -- a criminal record ultimately, the nonsensical action demonstrates the inability and a lack of desire on behalf of the administration to enforce the law, even against illegal immigrants convicted of serious crimes. we learned that 72% of the people released an okra record at all. another 21% had convictions for one or two misdemeanors only. unless to rector martin, who we welcome here today, tells us something different, this means that 93% of the people released by ice were not criminals or low, low level offenders. second, the title of the as for whether this was motivated by policy or politics, from my investigations, i don't believe it was either. i don't believe it was policy because we have no
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